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Teachers looking for new jobs for the next school year will find vastly different markets across the states and sometimes across school districts in the same state. Prospects range from dismal to great, even as state revenues recover from the Great Recession and many states invest more money in K-12 education.
Fewer people died in Massachusetts after the state required people to have health insurance, according to researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health.
Three states are holding primaries and voters might understandably be confused over what kind of identification they need to show at the polls.
The Supreme Court ruled that a town in upstate New York may begin its public meetings with a prayer from a “chaplain of the month.”
Becky Domokos-Bays of Alexandria City Public Schools has served her students whole-grain pasta 20 times. Each time, she said, they rejected it.
Louisiana will see billions of dollars in increased disaster costs as early as 2030 resulting from the combined effects of global warming and natural processes, according to a new National Climate Assessment report released by the White House.
Wisconsin's voter identification law places an unnecessary burden on poor and minority voters and must be struck down, a federal judge ruled.
Drivers on the nation’s Interstates could soon be paying more to travel.
Notwithstanding a court order, Massachusetts and other states plan to restrict use of a new painkiller drug, setting up a showdown with the federal government over who gets to decide the best way to protect public health.
The new criteria, which will be detailed later this week and are aimed at inmates serving time for nonviolent drug offenses, are intended to lead to a reduction in the nation’s federal prison population and also “ensure that those who have paid their debts have a chance to become productive citizens,” Holder said in a video message.